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The official publication of the North American Conference on British Studies (NACBS), the Journal of British Studies, has positioned itself as the critical resource for scholars of British culture from the Middle Ages through the present. Drawing on both established and emerging approaches, JBS presents scholarly articles and books reviews from renowned international authors who share their ideas on British society, politics, law, economics, and the arts. In 2005 (Vol. 44), the journal merged with the NACBS publication Albion, creating one journal for NACBS membership.

NACBS Awards (2012)

Prize List (see details below)

NACBS/Huntington Fellowship: Brendan Gillis. PhD candidate at Indiana University.  “The Current of Justice: Justices of the Peace and the Cultural Contours of the British Imperial State, 1745-1834”

Dissertation Year Fellowship: Alexis Harasemovitch Truax, University of Texas at Austin. Thesis title: "Subjects at Sea: Navigating Power in the British Mediterranean, 1661-1815." Supervisor: Philippa Levine 

Dissertation Year Travel Grant: Lauren Pepitone, Johns Hopkins University, Thesis title: "Legal London: A Cultural History of the Inner and Middle Temples, 1850-1940.” Supervisor: Judith Walkowitz

Walter Love Prize: Sarah Abrevaya Stein, “Protected Persons? The Baghdadi Jewish Diaspora, the British State, and the Persistence of Empire,” American Historical Review, vol. 116, no. 1 (February 2011): 80-108.

Walter Love Prizem, Honorable Mention: Guy Ortolano,  "Planning the Urban Future in 1960s Britain," The Historical Journal 54:2 (2011): 477-507.

John Ben Snow Prize: Simon Dickie, Cruelty & Laughter: Forgotten Comic Literature and the Unsentimental Eighteenth Century (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2011) and Ethan S. Shagan, The Rule of Moderation: Violence, Religion and the Politics of Restraint in Early Modern England(Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011).

Stansky Book Prize: Theodore Koditschek, Liberalism, Imperialism, and the Historical Imagination (Cambridge UP, 2011).

Undergraduate Essay Contest for U.S. Colleges and Universities


NACBS-Huntington Library Fellowship, 2010-11

Brendan Gillis. PhD candidate at Indiana University.  “The Current of Justice: Justices of the Peace and the Cultural Contours of the British Imperial State, 1745-1834” provides an innovative and interdisciplinary study of governance across the British empire. His proposal also made a most compelling case for the importance of  the manuscript and print collections of the Huntington Library for his research.

Dissertation Year Fellowship

Alexis Harasemovitch Truax, University of Texas at Austin. Thesis title: "Subjects at Sea: Navigating Power in the British Mediterranean, 1661-1815." Supervisor: Philippa Levine 

NACBS Travel Award

Lauren Pepitone, Johns Hopkins University, Thesis title: "Legal London: A Cultural History of the Inner and Middle Temples, 1850-1940.” Supervisor: Judith Walkowitz

Love Prize

Sarah Abrevaya Stein, “Protected Persons? The Baghdadi Jewish Diaspora, the British State, and the Persistence of Empire,” American Historical Review, vol. 116, no. 1 (February 2011): 80-108.

Love Prize, honorable mention

Guy Ortolano,  "Planning the Urban Future in 1960s Britain," The Historical Journal 54:2 (2011): 477-507.

Jon Ben Snow Prize

CO-WINNER: Simon Dickie, Cruelty & Laughter: Forgotten Comic Literature and the Unsentimental Eighteenth Century (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2011).

In Cruelty & Laughter, Simon Dickie shows that a society often seen as polite and sentimental was simultaneously cruel and vicious. Looking at major novels and writers of the eighteenth century as well as a wealth of lesser-known jestbooks, satires, cartoons, and legal transcripts, Dickie has revealed a culture that ruthlessly ridiculed its poorest and least capable. This deeply engaging work powerfully warns historians and literary scholars not to be drawn into the myth that eighteenth century British society was in all things enlightened and courteous.

CO-WINNER: Ethan S. Shagan, The Rule of Moderation: Violence, Religion and the Politics of Restraint in Early Modern England(Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011).

In The Rule of Moderation, Ethan S. Shagan argues that the language of moderation was an ideological rhetoric that sought to bring about peace, equanimity, and reason by exercising coercion, control, and violence. By the Glorious Revolution, the rule of moderation helped to explain a key paradox of English modernity, the reconciliation of liberty and authority that was central to the birth of the modern state. This is a deeply illuminating, richly provocative, and rigorously intellectual work of historical scholarship that will be debated for decades.

Stansky Book Prize

Theodore Koditschek for Liberalism, Imperialism, and the Historical Imagination (Cambridge UP, 2011).

In this carefully researched, compellingly written, psychologically insightful examination of the relationship between liberal ideas, imperial agendas, and historical writing in the nineteenth century, Theodore Koditschek seeks to answer one of the most perplexing questions about Britain’s empire; namely, how such an avowedly liberal state could have maintained and justified such a patently illiberal empire for so long. Drawing on the published writings and personal papers of leading nineteenth-centuryBritish, Irish, and Indian writers, Koditschek demonstrates that liberalism was central to the history of empire, both for the British and for many of those they ruled, albeit in different ways. One of the book’s many strengths is that Koditschek treats his subjects with great sympathy and understanding even where he is most critical of their ideas about progress and empire, highlighting the personal and familial contexts out of which those ideas emerged. Blending social, political, and intellectual history, Liberalism, Imperialism, and the Historical Imagination sheds new light on the role of historical imagination in the establishment and legitimation of liberal imperialism, and carefully delineates how the contradictions of empire could be managed with discourses of history and progress.

Undergraduate Essay Contest for U.S. Colleges and Universities 

PREVIOUS AWARD WINNERS

The winners of the prize and fellowship competitions are announced at the NACBS annual conference. Previous winners of recent competitions are available below: