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CALL FOR PAPERS
NORTH AMERICAN CONFERENCE ON BRITISH STUDIES

ANNUAL MEETING
BALTIMORE, MARYLAND
NOVEMBER 12-14, 2010

The NACBS and its Mid-Atlantic affiliate, the MACBS, seek participation by scholars in all areas of British Studies for the 2010 meeting.  We solicit proposals for panels on Britain, the British Empire, and the British world.  Our interests range from the medieval to the modern.  Though primarily a conference of historians, we welcome participation by scholars across the humanities and social sciences, especially on interdisciplinary panels.

We invite panel proposals addressing selected themes, methodology, and pedagogy, as well as roundtable discussions of topical and thematic interest, including conversations among authors of recent books.  North American scholars, international scholars, and graduate students are all encouraged to submit proposals to the NACBS Program Committee.

Strong preference will be given to complete panel or roundtable proposals that consider a common theme.  Panels typically include three papers and a comment; roundtables customarily have four presentations.  Individual paper proposals will also be considered in rare cases.  Those with single paper submissions are strongly encouraged to search for additional panelists on lists such as H-Albion or at venues such as the NACBS Facebook page.  Applicants may also write to the Program Chair for suggestions (nacbsprogram@gmail.com).

Committed to ensuring the broadest possible participation of scholars in British Studies, the Program Committee will give priority to those who did not read papers at the 2009 meeting.   Panels that include both graduate students and established scholars are especially encouraged, as are submissions with broad chronological focus and interdisciplinary breadth.  In order to encourage intellectual interchange, we ask applicants to compose panels that feature participation from a range of institutions.  Single-institution panels are not encouraged; similarly, graduate supervisors are discouraged from appearing on panels with their own students and very recent graduates.   No participant will be permitted to take part in more than one session except in exceptional circumstances cleared by the Program Committee, and no more than one proposal will be considered from each applicant.

All submissions must be received by March 1, 2010.
For details, directions, and online submission, see www.nacbs.org/conference.html.

Please send questions about panel requirements
and suggestions about program development to
Lara Kriegel, NACBS Program Chair
Department of History, Florida International University, Miami, FL 33199
nacbsprogram@gmail.com

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December
4
2009

New Reviews for November on Reviews in History

Posted by dannymillum under Announcement, IHR | 0 Comments

The following reviews of possible interest to followers of the Intelligencer were published in November in the Institute of Historical Research’s e-journal Reviews in History.

The first is a review by Alice Reid (no. 817, with editor’s response) of the Small and Special database of patient admissions at the hospital from 1852 until 1914.

Elsewhere a new paperback edition of the Blackwell Companion to Britain in the Later Middle Ages provoked debate (no. 816, and response) between Rowena Archer and the editor S. H. Rigby, while an unsettling account of racism in Britain, Sascha Auerbach’s Race, Law and ‘The Chinese Puzzle’ in Imperial Britain, is analysed (no. 815, again with an authorial response) by Flemming Christiansen.

A new collection of previously published essays by one of Britain’s leading economic historians, Martin Daunton, is reviewed (no. 821) by Jim Tomlinson, who finds State and Market in Victorian Britain: War, Welfare and Capitalism provides a powerful analysis of the dynamics of the Victorian state.

Another pre-eminent historian covered this month is Glenn Burgess, and you can read a review here (no. 822) by Sarah Mortimer of his latest work, British Political Thought, 1500-1660: The Politics of the Post-Reformation. The author’s response is also available.

Also, make sure to check out Peter Yearwood’s response to Carolyn Kitching’s review of Guarantee of Peace: The League of Nations in British Policy 1914-1925.

A very different subject is discussed in Catherine Rider’s take (no. 826) on an examination of differing presentations of men’s and women’s magic in the medieval period and beyond, Hedi Breuer’s Crafting the Witch: Gendering Magic in Medieval and Early Modern England.

The Cabinet Papers 1915-1978 is a new online resource from The National Archives, and is given a glowing review here (no. 828) by Michael J. Hopkins, while in the field of cultural history Ginger Frost’s Living in Sin: Cohabiting as Husband and Wife in Nineteenth-Century England is reviewed (no. 830) by Tanya Evans.

As always, all comments or suggestions should be sent to danny.millum@sas.ac.uk.

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December
3
2009

Call for Book Review Editors: H-Albion, Britain 1689-1815

Posted by jaskelly under Announcement, h-albion | Tags: book, book review, editor, h-albion | 0 Comments

H-Albion is looking for candidates to serve as our Book Review Editor for Britain (1689-1815).  Applications are invited from scholars specializing in the long eighteenth century.  The successful candidate will serve as book review editor for two years and will be responsible for commissioning and editing book reviews.

Please send a cover letter and CV to Jason M. Kelly at jaskelly@iupui.edu.

Application deadline is 23 December 2009.

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December
3
2009

British Studies Intelligencer (1962-2001) Online

Posted by jaskelly under Announcement, NACBS | 0 Comments

The NACBS is happy to announce that back issues of the British Studies Intelligencer (1962-2001) are available online at

http://www.ulib.iupui.edu/digitalscholarship/collections/BSI

The issues are open access and fully searchable.

The NACBS would like to thank the Library and the School of Liberal Arts at Indiana University-Purdue University, Indianapolis for scanning, hosting, and providing metadata for the back issues.  Special thanks are due to Peter Stansky and Kristi Palmer, Associate Librarian at IUPUI.

The Intelligencer, now the British and Irish Studies Intelligencer (BISI), is available as a blog through the NACBS website (at <http://www.nacbs.org/>)  or directly at http://nacbs.edublogs.org/.

There a still a few issues that are missing.  They are listed below  If you have old issues and are willing to offer them to the NACBS archive, please contact Jason M. Kelly at jaskelly@iupui.edu.

Series 1

1960, vol. 1, no. 1
1960, vol. 1, no. 2
1960, vol. 1, no. 3
1961, vol. 1, no. 4

1961, vol. 2, no. 1
1961, vol. 2, no. 2
1961, vol. 2, no. 3
1962, vol. 2, no. 4

1962, vol. 3, no. 2

1964, vol. 4, no. 1

1966, vol. 4, no. 3

Series 2

1971, vol. 2, no. 1

1972, vol. 2, no. 2
1972, vol. 2, no. 3

1973, vol. 3, no. 3

1975, vol. 5, no. 1

1975, vol. 6, no. 1

Series 3

1984, vol. 5, no. 1

Series 4

1990, vol. 6, no. 1

1991, vol. 7, no. 1


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November
30
2009

British Studies Intelligencer (1962-2001) Online

Posted by jaskelly under Announcement, NACBS | 0 Comments

The NACBS is happy to announce that back issues of the British Studies Intelligencer (1962-2001) are available online at

http://www.ulib.iupui.edu/digitalscholarship/collections/BSI

The issues are open access and fully searchable.

The NACBS would like to thank the Library and the School of Liberal Arts at Indiana University-Purdue University, Indianapolis for scanning, hosting, and providing metadata for the back issues.  Special thanks are due to Kristi Palmer, Digital Scholarship, Associate Librarian at IUPUI.

The Intelligencer, now the British and Irish Studies Intelligencer (BISI), is available as a blog through the NACBS website (at <http://www.nacbs.org/>)  or directly at http://nacbs.edublogs.org/.

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H-Albion is looking for candidates to serve as our Book Review Editor for England, Wales, and Scotland (1540-1689).  Applications are invited from scholars specializing in the early modern period.  The successful candidate will serve as book review editor for two years and will be responsible for commissioning and editing book reviews.

Please send a cover letter and CV to Jason M. Kelly at jaskelly@iupui.edu.

Application deadline is 20 December 2009.

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November
21
2009

PCCBS Annual Graduate Paper Prize

Posted by jaskelly under Announcement, Grants and Awards | Tags: awards, pccbs, prizes | 0 Comments

The Pacific Coast Conference on British Studies (PCCBS) invites
submissions for the annual prize for the best conference paper presented
during the 2009 calendar year by a graduate student member of the Pacific
Coast Conference on British Studies. The prize will be awarded at the
Spring 2010 meeting at Pomona College on March 19-21. The winner will
receive a monetary prize of $200.00 and be recognized at the annual
meeting.

Submissions should be made by the graduate student who presented the
paper. Both the student and major professor must be members of the PCCBS. All graduate student papers presented at the 2009 PCCBS meeting at the
University of San Diego are treated as submissions. Also eligible for
submission are papers presented at another conference held during the 2009
calendar year by a graduate student studying at a university within the
PCCBS region. Faculty advisors among the PCCBS membership are urged to
encourage their eligible students to participate in the prize competition.

The written version of the conference paper, mirroring the oral conference
presentation, must be based on original research and deal with a topic
within British Studies. Excursive footnotes may be added.

Submitted papers, along with documentation concerning the conference where
the paper was presented, must be received by the committee chair by
January 8, 2010. Please submit the paper in the form of a digital copy
sent as an email attachment or in the form of three hard-copies sent by
mail to:

Dr. Sammie McGlasson (Prize Committee Chair)
4425 Juanita Ave
Chino, CA 91710
sammiemac@earthlink.net

Reposted from http://www.pccbs.org/?p=133

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The National Archives, London has sent a response to the NACBS Principal Officers' letter of 10 September 2009 regarding the proposed changes to
TNA service prompted by budgetary cuts.  View the original letter here, and read the response here.

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November
12
2009

Bentley Brinkerhoff Gilbert (1924-2008)

Posted by jaskelly under Obituaries | 0 Comments

Bentley-Brinkerhoff_GilbertExecutive secretary of the North American Conference on British Studies and editor of the Journal of British Studies

Bentley Brinkerhoff Gilbert, emeritus professor of history at the University of Illinois at Chicago, died in Mansfield, Ohio, on April 5, 2008, his 84th birthday. Mansfield, in east-central Ohio, where his family had lived since the mid-19th century, always meant a great deal to Bentley Gilbert, and he returned there to live shortly after his retirement from UIC in 1997. He was especially proud that his great-grandfather, Brigadier General Roeliff Brinkerhoff, served in the Union Army under William Tecumseh Sherman and was in charge of the field transportation of the Army of the Ohio. Gilbert graduated from Mansfield High School in 1942 and served during World War II with the U.S. Army Air Corps 308th Airdrome Squadron in the Pacific Theater, with campaign service in New Guinea and the Philippines. His own war experience, as well as that of his father in World War I in France and his great-grandfather in the Civil War, always remained of abiding concern in Gilbert’s scholarship and teaching. This interest was especially reflected in the second volume of the Lloyd George biography and in his short book, Britain, 1914–45 (1996). By the 1990s, save for his graduate component, Gilbert was teaching mostly military history. Undergraduates would squirm with delight—or not—when Gilbert would bring to class antiquated but well-preserved family military heirlooms for their inspection.

After his discharge from the military, Gilbert received his BA (1949) at Miami University, Oxford, Ohio, and an MA at the University of Cincinnati (1950). He worked under Paul Knaplund in British history at the University of Wisconsin at Madison, where he received his PhD in 1954. Bentley Gilbert’s first permanent job was teaching European history at Colorado College (1954–67) and he came to what was then the University of Illinois at Chicago Circle in 1967. Despite its later upgrade to the University of Illinois at Chicago, Gilbert always called UIC, with great fondness, “The Circle.” From his dissertation in 1954 to his last scholarly publications in the mid-1990s, Bentley Gilbert was concerned with the intersection in early and mid-20th-century Britain of social policy and politics, with the minutia of the working out of the social plans of the New Liberalism and with the political agendas of the men— Masterman, Lloyd George, Beveridge—who implemented the grand vision. His first book, The Evolution of National Insurance in Great Britain: The Origins of the Welfare State (1966), focused on the process of how social insurance rather than socialism became the framework for an eventual welfare state within a capitalist society. This work was followed in 1970 by British Social Policy, 1914–39, in which Gilbert discussed the development, admittedly somewhat lackadaisical, of welfare policy before the outbreak of World War II. He concluded that “This policy evolved, like the British empire, in a fit of absence of mind.” In 1973, Gilbert edited C.F.G. Masterman’s classic work of 1901, The Heart of the Empire. During the next two decades, Gilbert wrote two volumes of a study on David Lloyd George’s life before the premiership. The overall title was David Lloyd George: A Political Life, with Volume I (1987) sub-titled The Architect of Change, 1863–1912 and Volume II (1992) The Organizer of Victory, 1912–16. The second volume won the 1993 Society of Midland Authors Prize for Biography. It had been his intention to round out Lloyd George’s life by completing one volume on the last two years of the war and one on the postwar premiership and political career, but despite completing the work through 1917, it remained unfinished at his death. Gilbert published articles in Albion, the American Historical Review, The Historian, the Historical Journal, and the Journal of British Studies. Bentley Gilbert was a fellow of the Royal Historical Society, received three fellowships from the National Institutes of Health, and in 1973–74 a John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship.

Gilbert served as executive secretary to the North American Conference on British Studies from 1974 to 1978; as editor of the Journal of British Studies from 1978 to 1983; as president of the Midwest Conference on British Studies from 1988 to 1990; and as secretary to the newly formed American Friends of the Institute of Historical Research, London, during the early 1990s. Perhaps his most important administrative contribution to British history in the United States was his successful proposal, in 1983, at the end of his term as editor, to settle the formerly peripatetic Journal of British Studies at the University of Chicago Press, where it has remained and flourished. Bentley Gilbert was chair of the Department of History at UIC from 1988 to 1991.

Gilbert was exceedingly proud of the eight graduate students whose dissertations on 20th-century Britain he directed: Barbara Farr, Barbara Kehoe, Doris Racich, Norman Eder, Neal McCrillis, Andrew Wiest, Eugene Beiriger, and Septimus Paul. He also endowed a fellowship at UIC for PhD candidates in European history. During his years in Illinois he was a lay reader and vestryman at St. Elisabeth’s Episcopal Church in Glencoe. He is survived by four children, Bentley Junior, Margaret, Louis, and Francis, by three step-children, Ellen and Arthur Gallagher and Daisy Archie, and by four grandchildren, Jacob, Sylvia, Ethan, and Lydia Gilbert.

—James J. Sack
University of Illinois at Chicago
Katharine Stohrer

© American Historical Association
With permission from the American Historical Association
This article originally appeared in the September 2009 issue of Perspectives
on History
and in Perspectives Online at http://www.historians.org/perspectives/issues/2009/0909/0909mem2.cfm

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November
10
2009

NACBS Prizes 2009

Posted by jaskelly under Announcement | 0 Comments

Prize List (scroll down for details)

  • John Ben Snow Prize: Jennifer Summit (Stanford), Memory's Library: Medieval Books in Early Modern England.
  • Albion Prize:  Richard Price (Maryland), Making Empire: Colonial Encounters and the Creation of Imperial Rule in Nineteenth-Century Africa.
  • Walter Love Prize: Julia Rudolph (Pennsylvania), "Gender and the Development of Forensic Science," English Historical Review 123 (503).
  • Dissertation Year Fellowship: Philip Hnatkovich (Penn State), "The Atlantic Gate: Anglo-French Geographies of Expertise in the Western Channel Community 1558-1685".
  • Dissertation Year Travel Grant: Michele Hanks (Illinois), "Narrating Anxiety and Disruption: An Anthropological Examination of the Production of Knowledge by Contemporary English Ghost Hunters"
  • NACBS-Huntington Library Fellowship: Joseph Stubenrauch (Indiana), "Faith in Goods: Evangelicalism, Materiality, and Consumer Culture in Nineteenth-century Britain".

John Ben Snow Prize: Jennifer Summit (Stanford), Memory's Library: Medieval Books in Early Modern England (University of Chicago Press)

In Memory's Library: Medieval Books in Early Modern England, Jennifer Summit shows us the subtle yet powerful ways in which libraries of the past continue to construct our own perceptions of English history. She reminds us that reading was and is an embodied activity: where and how texts are stored and used shapes how they might be read and how the ideas they contain might be marshaled to serve particular ends. Her riveting book traces the transformation of the library from a collection into a place. She follows manuscripts as they were removed from the chests and choir stalls in which monks once hoarded them and placed in rooms designed for a wider readership. Medieval texts that survived the end of monasticism thus played new roles as the choices of collectors like Bodley, Parker, and Cotton created a medieval past designed to serve contemporary political purposes. Memory itself was reconstituted by an active, if sometimes contemptuous, Renaissance interest in monastic works and modes of reading. In this way, libraries generated new forms of collective identity, and laid the foundations for the archives on which modern scholarship now depends. As Summit concludes, our libraries—and the reading we and our forebears have always done in them—are “one part preservation, one part invention, and one part disavowal.

Albion Prize: Richard Price (Maryland), Making Empire: Colonial Encounters and the Creation of Imperial Rule in Nineteenth-Century Africa

Based on extensive and sophisticated archival research, and lucidly written, Richard Price’s Making Empire: Colonial Encounters and the Creation of Imperial Rule in Nineteenth-Century Africa examines the way in which the British imperial experience in the eastern Cape unfolded as a string of failures that spiraled into great brutality. In so doing, he demonstrates that there was nothing inevitable and pre-conceived about the introduction of racism to colonial discourse. Its appeal for local European actors emanated first and foremost from the failure of different civilizing missionary projects, whose utopian and fragile nature Price makes clear. It is surely no accident that Price has chosen to give his book a title that echoes E. P. Thompson’s, Making of the English Working Class since another accomplishment of his book is its nuanced account of the making of colonial subjects. Price’s detailed and insightful descriptions of individuals--on both sides of the encounter--seeks to understand what drove the people that initiated and executed them and how colonial settings shaped their behavior and views. Making Empire also proposes a different (and much strained) relationship between knowledge and the imperial project, especially in comparison with the Foucauldian and the Saidian approaches. This—and possibly other—imperial episodes were marked by persistent mis-recognition, by a profound inability to know, to recognize the colonial other. Price’s focus on the frontier and the tremendous violence that was at the heart of the colonial encounter between the British and the Xhosa makes clear the gap between empire as understood at home and as a lived experience.

Walter Love Prize: Julia Rudolph, "Gender and the Development of Forensic Science" English Historical Review 2008 123 (503).

Rudolph's case study of the contentious seventeenth century trial of Spencer Cowper for the murder of Sarah Stout produces a nuanced reading of women’s participation in the development of forensic science.  Sarah Stout was found dead in the river.   Determined to clear her daughter's reputation, her mother Mary drew on her class status and literacy to challenge local assumptions that her daughter had committed suicide after abandonment by a lover.   The mother's willingness to press for the exhumation and dissection of the dead body six weeks after burial and the summoning of women as legal experts who could testify to her daughter’s chastity demonstrates women’s agency in the development of forensic science.  Rudolph uses the Stout materials as a powerful lens not only onto changing attitudes to evidence but as well onto assumptions about gender and the practices of social hierarchy and connection.  Rudolph shows that in this case women were active agents in the pressure for and use of expert witnesses in a legal trial, complicating our understanding of the operations of gender in the development of scientific testimony.

NACBS Dissertation Year Fellowship:
 Philip Hnatkovich (Penn State), "The Atlantic Gate: Anglo-French Geographies of Expertise in the Western Channel Community 1558-1685"

The NACBS Dissertation Year Fellowship has been awarded to Philip Hnatkovich at Penn State for his project 'The Atlantic Gate: Anglo-French Geographies of Expertise in the Western Channel Community 1558-1685', working under the supervision of Professor Daniel Beaver.  The project traces the development of Protestant-rooted, kinship-based networks of entrepreneurs and traders that enveloped the ports of southwest England and northwest France between the accession of Elizabeth I and the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes in 1685.  Using a remarkable body of material in local archives in England and France, it reconstructs a largely heretofore-ignored Anglo-Huguenot merchant community.  In particular, Hnatkovich argues that the commercial culture created by economic and human exchanges in this 'Western Channel Community' shaped the development of early English and French maritime expertise.  The Western Channel in turn served as a dynamic testing ground for new methods of long-range seafaring, mercantile organization, and colonization in the Atlantic World and the Mediterranean.  Finally, the project aims to firmly position the European antecedents for Atlantic exploration and colonization in this Western Channel Community.

NACBS Travel Award:

 Michele Hanks (Illinois), "Narrating Anxiety and Disruption: An Anthropological Examination of the Production of Knowledge by Contemporary English Ghost Hunters"

The NACBS Travel Award has been awarded to Michelle Hanks at the University of Illinois for her project 'Narrating Anxiety and Disruption: An Anthropological Examination of the Production of Knowledge by Contemporary English Ghost Hunters', working under the supervision of Professor Virginia Dominguez.  The project investigates the production and consumption of paranormal knowledge as a way to question the nature of contemporary English belief in the paranormal as well as popular articulations of nationalism.  The project will be grounded in participant observation and ethnographic fieldwork focused on contemporary ghost hunters in London and York, and the processes by which ghost narratives become public through ghost tourism, museums, heritage sites, journalism, and popular media.  Hanks aims to demonstrate that ghosts that emerge across the landscape are remnants of a particular English past, marked by moments of social disruption and political upheaval, from Viking and Roman invaders right through to contemporary uncertainty centered around EU migration and terror.

NACBS Huntington Library Fellowship
: Joseph Stubenrauch's project, "Faith in Goods: Evangelicalism, Materiality, and Consumer Culture in Nineteenth-century Britain,"

Joseph Stubenrauch's project focuses on religious consumer practices in order to uncover the central role of materiality in evangelical religious experience.  His work undercuts the secularization thesis from a novel angle, by delineating how religion and modernity were intertwined and how they reinforced one another. To demonstrate these interconnections, Joseph has already consulted a diverse array of sources: handbills, needlework, porcelain, wall decorations, prints and sheet music as well as memoirs and tract society papers.  One key source would be the grangerized Kitto bible with its 30,000 religious prints and engravings, available only at the Huntington Library.

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